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The Tumblog of one Jim Dovey, iOS Software Chief Architect at Kobo in Toronto, Ontario.
He Twitters, he has an , and can occasionally be found on LinkedIn or Facebook.
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This blog contains personal opinions, and is not endorsed by any company.

You can buy Jim's book, Beginning Objective-C, either directly from Apress as an eBook or in print from Amazon:

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On two occasions I have been asked, ‘Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?’ I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
Charles Babbage, grandfather of the computer.

New Blog Post: eBook DRM and unDRM 

I had the honour of moderating a panel on eBook DRM technology for the W3C earlier this week, and I’ve taken the liberty of expanding upon my presentation and providing some more talking points.

The main thrust of the argument: there are good and useful end-user features that we can build using the same technology normally used for restrictions. As long as we’re using this tech, let’s do the good things too.

Click through the link for the full post on my new blog.

dgaider:

afternoonsnoozebutton:

“Dear Internet” by Tina Fey

From PerezHilton.com/Posted by jerkstore on Wednesday, 1/21/2009, 11:21 P.M.

“In my opinion Tina Fey completely ruined SNL. The only reason she’s celebrated is because she’s a woman and an outspoken liberal. She has not a single funny bone in her body.”

“Dear jerkstore,

Huzzah for the Truth Teller! Women in this country have been over-celebrated for too long. Just last night there was a story on my local news about a “missing girl,” and they must have dedicated seven or eight minutes to “where she was last seen” and “how she might have been abducted by a close family friend,” and I thought, “What is this, the News for Chicks?” Then there was some story about Hillary Clinton flying to some country because she’s secretary of state. Why do we keep talking about these dumdums? We are a society that constantly celebrates no one but women and it must stop! I want to hear what the men of the world have been up to. What fun new guns have they invented? What are they raping these days? What’s Michael Bay’s next film going to be?

When I first set out to ruin SNL, I didn’t think anyone would notice, but I persevered because—like you trying to do a nine-piece jigsaw puzzle—it was a labor of love.

I’m not one to toot my own horn, but I feel safe with you, jerkstore, so I’ll say it. Everything you ever hated on SNL was by me, and anything you ever liked was by someone else who did it against my will.

Sincerely,

Tina Fey

P.S. You know who does have a funny bone in her body? Your mom every night for a dollar.”

(source)

Too bad Tina Fey doesn’t meet jerkstore’s standards. I think she’s incredible.

parislemon:

brucesterling:

Erik De Nijs conceptual keyboard pants, photo by Tim Smit.  A design-fiction from Utrecht School of the Arts.

Just typing on my jock, no biggie.

Can I get these in <a href=”http://colemak.com”>Colemak</a> please?

Because Jimmy Page just turned 69 today: Stairway to Heaven Live (HD), from The Song Remains The Same.

Developing for iOS in a Server-Centric World 

Turns out, developing iOS apps is different from developing web apps. Like, hella different. For any server-side readers out there, I thought I’d hit you with a few big ones: There is no CSS. Every part of a design has to be coded in Objective-C.

  • There is no flow layout (like HTML). Everything is position: absolute;.
  • Small “cosmetic changes” can mean hours or days for developers to complete.
  • No one unit tests in Cocoa. Like, no one.
  • Likewise, unit testing is a bitch.
  • No one does automated UI testing. There are some open source projects, but it’s far from the mainstream.

Truth from Mr. Furrow there. As someone who went the other way, I can absolutely say that folks using some of these new server-side frameworks have a ridiculously easy time of it.

Things are starting to change on our side, of course: starting back in the late 80’s with Interface Builder and the Application Kit, and more recently with Cocoa Autolayout. There’s still a world of difference between tweaking a CSS file to change a button’s composition and doing that in Cocoa however.

Blade of Manliness +2

wilwheaton:

People of both sexes and all ages play video games and watch movies in every country in the world.

Only in America do we have an epidemic of gun violence and repeated mass murder.

The problem isn’t video games and movies, guys.

giant robots smashing into other giant robots: She Blinded Me with Ruby Science 

thoughtbot:

Ruby Science

We love Rails, object-oriented programming, and refactoring. We use a process to develop applications to work faster, introduce fewer bugs, and enjoy what we’re doing. We blog, Tweet, and talk at conferences on these subjects.

After every post and discussion, there are topics left…

Hot. Shit.

Go get it.

wilwheaton:

I posted this on Twitter this morning, because I believe it’s good advice, but about 1 in 20 or so replies accused me of being selfish or narcissistic, or — worst of all — an Objectivist.
I’m not a big fan of getting into “Someone is wrong on the Interent,” but I wanted to clarify a little bit in a way that Twitter does not allow.
What I get out of this quote is this: if there is a toxic person in your life who does nothing but bring you down and hurt you, then you should respect yourself enough to remove that person from your life. Life is too short to maintain toxic and negative relationships.
This doesn’t mean that you don’t make an effort to work on building and maintaining positive, healthy, fulfilling relationships. It doesn’t mean that you don’t make an effort to be kind and generous and just take take take. It means that if you’re constantly “making up” or something like that with a person, you’re not in a healthy, fulfilling relationship. You’re in a toxic relationship, and time you spend maintaining toxic relationships is time wasted that could be spent — invested — into relationships that bring you joy and make you a better person.
Know and recognize the difference between healthy and toxic relationships, positive and negative people, and respect — and love — yourself enough to choose the ones that make you happy and inspire you to grow as much as you possibly can. People who drag you down because it makes them feel better about themselves are not worth your time.
Where I think people may have interpreted this as selfish or narcissistic is in the clumsy wording of people or activities “serving” you. I’d take people out of that portion of the advice and apply it directly to the forehead.
Or, you know, just apply it to the “activities” part and think about where you’re investing your time and energy — your most precious and limited resource — and what yo’ure getting back from it.
Mostly, though, this quote encapsulates advice I’ve given my children and applied to my own life: respect yourself enough to leave a romantic or platonic or business relationship that is causing you more harm than good. To borrow a quote from Green Day: “You can’t go forcing something if it’s just not right.”

wilwheaton:

I posted this on Twitter this morning, because I believe it’s good advice, but about 1 in 20 or so replies accused me of being selfish or narcissistic, or — worst of all — an Objectivist.

I’m not a big fan of getting into “Someone is wrong on the Interent,” but I wanted to clarify a little bit in a way that Twitter does not allow.

What I get out of this quote is this: if there is a toxic person in your life who does nothing but bring you down and hurt you, then you should respect yourself enough to remove that person from your life. Life is too short to maintain toxic and negative relationships.

This doesn’t mean that you don’t make an effort to work on building and maintaining positive, healthy, fulfilling relationships. It doesn’t mean that you don’t make an effort to be kind and generous and just take take take. It means that if you’re constantly “making up” or something like that with a person, you’re not in a healthy, fulfilling relationship. You’re in a toxic relationship, and time you spend maintaining toxic relationships is time wasted that could be spent — invested — into relationships that bring you joy and make you a better person.

Know and recognize the difference between healthy and toxic relationships, positive and negative people, and respect — and love — yourself enough to choose the ones that make you happy and inspire you to grow as much as you possibly can. People who drag you down because it makes them feel better about themselves are not worth your time.

Where I think people may have interpreted this as selfish or narcissistic is in the clumsy wording of people or activities “serving” you. I’d take people out of that portion of the advice and apply it directly to the forehead.

Or, you know, just apply it to the “activities” part and think about where you’re investing your time and energy — your most precious and limited resource — and what yo’ure getting back from it.

Mostly, though, this quote encapsulates advice I’ve given my children and applied to my own life: respect yourself enough to leave a romantic or platonic or business relationship that is causing you more harm than good. To borrow a quote from Green Day: “You can’t go forcing something if it’s just not right.”

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